Westmead Road, Carshalton, Sutton, London

Our landscape architects were appointed by a developer client to prepare a landscape design and a package of information to support a detailed planning submission for this proposed 0.18ha residential development with car parking and a communal play space.

The existing brownfield plot is approximately square in shape and is currently occupied by a commercial business and its associated yard. To the north and east of the plot is the Westmead Road and Carshalton Grove. To the west is an industrial building with associated car parking and to the south are residential dwellings. A bus stop is located on Westmead Road, outside the north west corner of the plot. The site is approximately flat and there are no trees on or adjacent to the plot.

The proposed landscape design provides all ground floor dwellings with private patios; resident parking to the rear of the development with access off Carshalton Grove via the undercroft; and a communal under 5 years play area. The area of residents parking located outside of the footprint of the building is located under a pergola structure with climbers. The intention is to help to reduce the visual impact of this functional area.

An amount of permeable paving was required within our landscape design to accommodate the requirements of the Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS) strategy. This was located within the external parking bays.

Play equipment which would facilitate natural play and encourage children to be creative was specified for the under 5 years play area, which also accommodates facilities for the children’s carers. Our landscape architects specified play equipment which would facilitate natural play and encourage children to be creative.

Our landscape architects were also appointed to prepare an Existing Play Provision Assessment to support the planning application for this development. It was based on the guidance set out in the Supplementary Planning Guidance (SPG) – Shaping Neighbourhoods: Play and Informal Recreation (2012). In addition, we identified the Play Provision Requirements generated by the proposed accommodation schedule associated with this residential development. Our report identified the minimum area of under 5 years play space that would be required to comply with the SPG guidance.

To support the planning application, our landscape architects were tasked with the preparation of Green Space Factor Calculation for this brownfield development. This was based on guidance as set out in Building A Sustainable Sutton: Technical Guidance Notes for Developers.

Leyton Green Road, Walthamstow, London

Our landscape architects were appointed by a contractor client to prepare a package of information to support a detailed planning submission for this proposed 0.4ha residential development located on a brownfield plot. We were then tasked with the preparation of full landscape architect ‘s tender and construction packages of information. Finally, we are to monitor the external works as they progress on site.

This development plot is currently occupied by a respite care centre and its associated outbuildings and gardens. The plot has an irregular shape with existing dwellings and their associated rear gardens beyond the north west and south west boundaries. Part of the plot fronts onto Leyton Green Road and part onto Matlock Road. There is a level change of approximately 1m across the site. There are a significant number of mature trees within the site boundary. These are located at the north corner, a group adjacent to the Leyton Green Road and a row at the south west corner of the plot. The majority of these trees are to be retained.

The site layout has been developed so the existing terrace along Leyton Green Road is continued and completed within the plot boundary. To the rear of the plot, running north south, a larger building mass is proposed. This building arrangement has been developed so as to minimise the detrimental impact on the trees to be retained. This building arrangement provides a communal courtyard space at the centre of the site and open green space at the north of the plot.

The predominantly hard paved communal courtyard space provides a place for residents of this development to meet and socialise. Incidental play elements for children under the age of 5 are integrated within the courtyard’s landscape design. The open green space to the north of the courtyard provide a softer, less formal space in which to socialise and play. This space accommodates play equipment catering for children up to the age of 11. Two disabled parking spaces are located to the south of the courtyard space.

The boundaries to the site were carefully considered so as to provide a meaningful secure line to this development. Where possible the existing condition was retained and made good. The new perimeter boundaries were specified as brick to match the proposed building and topped with railing where necessary.

Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS) strategies were adopted for the majority of the paved surfaces. A below ground attenuation tank was integrated into the landscape design of the courtyard space.

Comments compiled from public consultation events were incorporated into our landscape design where possible.

Leatherhead Road Chessington, Kingston, London

Our landscape architects were appointed by a developer client to prepare a package of landscape architect ‘s information to support a detailed planning submission for this proposed residential development.

The development plot is currently occupied by eight existing dwellings and their associated gardens. It is approximately square in shape with existing dwellings and their associated rear gardens to the north east; south east; and south west boundaries. Its north west boundary fronts onto the busy Leatherhead Road. There is a significant level change across the site, rising up approximately 3m to the rear of the plot from the Leatherhead Road. There are a significant number of existing ornamental trees within and just outside of the plot boundary.

Due to the existing site topography it was decided that a lower ground floor parking would be located at the Leatherhead Road frontage, beneath the private patios. The levels from Leatherhead road to the main courtyard space was therefore carefully considered to ensure they could accommodate vehicles and provide a safe DDA compliant route for pedestrians.

At the heart of the scheme is a courtyard space. This accommodates private parking to each dwelling at its perimeter and at its centre is ‘The Green’. The landscape design for the ‘The Green’ provides a communal space for the residents of this development and incorporates planting, seating and informal elements of play. This feature has been designed to intercept some of the surface water runoff from the paved areas and is an integral part of the site SUDS strategy.

The Leatherhead Road elevation and boundary condition was carefully considered by our landscape architects. It was important that this edge be softened by planting and that it provides seating opportunities for pedestrians. The hit and miss brick pattern in conjunction with the planting provide an attractive finish to the ventilation serving the car park behind.

The boundaries to the rear gardens were designed so as to minimise the visual impact of this proposed development on the surrounding dwellings. Our landscape design suggests they should be heavily planted with native trees.

Comments from the Local Authority and those following a Design Review Panel presentation were incorporated into our landscape design. This involved simplifying the paving strategy to the courtyard space and incorporating additional native plant species into our plant palette.

Equinix Data Centre, Blanchardstown, Dublin

Our landscape architects were appointed by a data centre client to prepare a package of landscape architect ‘s information to support a detailed planning submission. We were then tasked with the preparation of a detailed package of information to enable the tender of the external works.

This brownfield site is approximately rectangular in shape and located on an existing business park. It is currently occupied by a commercial building and an area of car parking. A significant number of existing trees are located just outside of the plot boundary, to its western edge. Park access roads are located to its south and east boundaries and an existing building to its north boundary. A high voltage pylon is located at the centre of the car park, with its cables running east/ west.

Our scope was to design functional parking and pedestrian circulation routes for the plot; accommodate the necessary existing and proposed infrastructure; and to provide a structural landscape setting for this new data centre building.

The west boundary was of particular concern to the Local Authority both in terms of the continued health of the existing trees and the visual impact of the new building when viewed from this busy road. The root protection areas of these existing trees needed to be carefully considered when developing our layout, as the existing and proposed levels varied considerably along this edge. To mitigate the potential visual impact of this new building, our landscape architects specified supplementary trees in addition to those that already exist along this edge.

The ecological benefits of our planting proposals were carefully scrutinised by the Local Authority. Our landscape design accommodated native hedge planting to the south and east boundaries and native woodland edge planting to the west boundary. The trees specified were a combination of native and ornamental. The planting palette within the wayleave of the high voltage cable was carefully considered by our landscape architects and signed off by the statutory authority. Within the body of the site a robust, ornamental palette of planting was adopted.

New Kent Road, Southwark

Our landscape architects were appointed by a developer client to prepare two packages of landscape architect ‘s information to support two separate detailed planning submissions. The plot is a brownfield site and is currently occupied by a commercial building and an area of hard standing. Its southern elevation fronts onto the busy New Kent Road, close to the Brick Layers Arms roundabout.

The plot is approximately square in shape; with an existing school playground to its north; a commercial building to its west; a terrace of Victorian houses to its east and the New Kent Road to its south. Within the footway of the New Kent Road, just outside of the plot boundary, one significant tree is located.

The two landscape designs prepared by us were for student accommodation located above a flexible working space and a hotel located above a flexible working space. The landscape design for both proposals focused on the ground floor parking, green courtyard, pedestrian circulation and access arrangements; Level 1 extensive green roof; and Levels 4, 6 and 8 communal gardens.

Comments from the Local Authority and those following a Design Review Panel presentation were integrated into our landscape design. A significant number of climbers were added to the elevations of the building at all levels and appropriate robust planters were located accordingly. The climbers were intended to help minimise the visual impact of the building when approached from the flyover to the Brick Layers Arms roundabout and to provide additional ecological benefits.

The edge detail of the communal gardens were carefully considered by our landscape architects so as to minimise the potential for overlooking to the school playground and to the terrace of houses. This was achieved by setting back the pedestrian areas from the building edge and introducing appropriate raised planters with planting into this zone. Within these planters, bespoke benches were set, facing away from the building edge. At Level 8 a pergola structure with climbers was integrated in the landscape design to provide some shading and a sense of enclosure in this exposed location.

The proposed planting was carefully selected to suit its specified location. The communal roof gardens planting was selected to thrive in this exposed roof top environment. The planting to the small ground floor courtyard space was suitable for this tranquil, shady space.

Evolve Ph1, Colchester, Essex

Our landscape architects were appointed by a developer client to prepare landscape architect ‘s information to satisfy landscape related reserved matter conditions for this consented outline scheme. The plot is located on a green field site at the northern edge of Colchester, adjacent to the A12. Our appointment was limited to the southeastern section of the plot, including the communal access road. This portion of the consented scheme was 1.5ha in area and included 90 small business office units and associated infrastructure.

The plot is approximately rectangular in shape. It has an existing hedge that contains occasional trees to its east and south boundaries; a commercial building to its north boundary and open field to its west boundary. Parallel to the west boundary, offset by approximately 40m, is a significant line of existing mature trees. All these trees, with one exception, are considered to be Category B in accordance with BS 5837:2015 “Trees in relation to design, demolition and construction – Recommendations”. Our landscape architects were expected to provide a landscape design which contained relevant information sufficient to satisfy the condition associated with the continued healthy growth of theses trees. This particularly related to the nature and build up of the paved surface within their root protection areas (RPAs).

Our landscape design considered a number of issues critical to the functioning of this site. These included vehicular movement through the site, providing the required number of parking spaces (including disabled), safe pedestrian movement throughout the site and the introduction of structural landscape planting. It was essential that full Part M compliant pedestrian access could be provided throughout the site.

The soft landscape specified for this project aimed to be as beneficial to wildlife as possible. The planting specified was a mixture of structural ornamental planting and wild life friendly/ native species.

Maritime House, Clapham, London

Our landscape architects were appointed by a asset manager client to prepare an initial landscape design for client and design team sign off for this office refurbishment project. We then prepared a landscape package of planning information, tender information and construction status landscape architect ’s information. Once the project was under construction we were required to attend site at critical times.

The area requiring our landscape architects input was approximately rectangular in shape and located in the Clapham Conservation Area. It is bound by the building, two private pedestrian footpaths and a public footpath to the front of the plot. The exiting wall and coping to the front of the plot were to be retained.

The existing building is set back from the wide public footpath, providing sufficient space for occasional in out vehicular access within the pedestrian zone. This access provides an allowance for occasional necessary deliveries and drop off. A clearly defined pedestrian route bisecting this space was proposed by our landscape architects, providing a direct pedestrian route from the public footway to the main building entrance.

Due to the significant level change between the public footpath and main building entrance, Part M compliant access was considered carefully within our landscape design. A direct stepped access was provided to the main entrance and was defined by a different paving material. A ramped accesses was provided on one side of the main entrance.

The detail between the existing building and the proposed Part M compliant ramp needed to be carefully considered by our landscape architects as the existing air bricks to the building were below the proposed paving level.

Planting beds with trees were specified to the perimeter of the paved areas helping our landscape architects to deal with the level changes across the site and provide an attractive setting for this historic building.

Brunel House, Portsmouth Harbour

Our landscape architects were appointed by a developer client to prepare a landscape design for this permitted development in a seafront location, adjacent to Portsmouth Harbour railway station. We were then tasked to prepare a tender status landscape architect ’s package information. The client’s intention was to convert a former office building into commercial units at ground floor with residential dwellings above.

The area requiring landscape architect ‘s input was approximately triangular in shape and was bound by the building, a footpath to The Hard road and a small building, to the north of the plot boundary. A significant existing tree is located just outside of the southwest plot boundary, within the public footway.

The existing building is set back from the main road, providing sufficient space in front of the proposed ground floor commercial units for in out vehicular access. This access provided an allowance for customer drop off, service vehicles and deliveries. Our landscape design incorporated a crossing to this vehicular access, providing a direct safe pedestrian route from the public footway to the proposed commercial unit entrance.

Two planting beds between the public footway and the proposed vehicular access were accommodated within our landscape design. This provided an opportunity to introduce an additional tree and ground cover planting within this location. In addition, by removing the former area of hard standing within the area of the proposed planting beds, additional water and oxygen will be provided to the root protection area of the existing tree within the footway.

At the southeast corner of the plot frontage the communal residential entrance was proposed. This was set a half a floor level up from that of the commercial unit. Our landscape architects designed the route to the proposed pedestrian entrance to be fully Part M compliant. Therefore, compliant ramped and stepped accesses were provided.

Kilburn High Road, Camden, London

Our landscape architects were appointed by a fund manager client to prepare landscape architect ‘s information to satisfy landscape related conditions for this consented infill residential development located behind commercial units on Kilburn High Road. A sketch landscape design was initially prepared to enable discussion between all design team members.

The existing plot is situated on a brown field site which is relatively flat and currently contains car parking, storage and a single storey building. This is accessed via an undercroft pedestrian and vehicular route between commercial units located on the Kilburn High Road. The plot is currently enclosed by buildings on three sides with Kilburn Grange Park to the east.

The proposed courtyard space needs to provide pedestrian access to the communal entrance of this new development, two private patios fronting onto the courtyard, cycle storage for residents of this development and vehicular access to the substation located within the courtyard. Our landscape architects spent significant time coordinating our information with the project architect, civil engineer and services engineer to ensure all parties were happy within our proposed landscape design.

There was much discussion about the location of planting with the courtyard space between our landscape architects and the other members of the design team. The result of these discussions dictated that two small trees and planting were to be located in two raised planters within the space. These planters needed to be moveable as they are located over high voltage cabling in ducts which provided power to the substation.

To the existing south boundary wall our landscape architects specified a robust vertical timber trellis. This treatment has been applied to the entire length of this boundary wall, from the proposed building frontage, through the undercroft to the Kilburn High Road. The section of trellis located outside of the undercroft zone is to be planted with climbers suitable for this shady elevation.

All planting specified by our landscape architects is suitable for this potentially shaded environment and will provide all year round interest, in the form of attractive leaf, bark and flowers.

Robinson Building, Chesterford Research Park, Essex

We were appointed as landscape architects by a developer client on this new build office and research development located on a 1.27ha brownfield plot. Our scope was to review the existing landscape design, provide landscape architect ’s information to discharge conditions; a full package of tender and construction information for the external works; periodically attend progress meetings and to inspect the on site works as they progressed until the completion of the project.

The existing plot is set within an attractive setting of open parkland, an arboretum and a number of lakes. These elements in conjunction with other laboratory, office and supporting buildings and infrastructure combine to form Chesterford Research Park.

Our landscape architect ‘s strategic landscape design for this development needed to consider and accommodate vehicular circulation, car and cycle parking, pedestrian circulation and wayfinding and Building Control Part M compliance. Due to the parkland setting of this development the screening of car parking and service plant with vegetation was considered essential.

The palette of hard landscape materials were carefully selected by our landscape architects to ensure the external works complemented that of the built form. Contrasting materials were selected to define the vehicular running surface and the parking bays, with contrasting blocks defining the edges of the individual parking bays. A large entrance plaza with banding within the paving was designed by our landscape architects to provide an appropriate setting for the main entrance to the building. To the rear of the building a break out space was designed within a courtyard space. The planting within this area was carefully selected to thrive in this shaded location.

Where possible native planting was specified by our landscape architects to provide valuable wildlife habitat and foraging opportunities for the local fauna. This included Hawthorn hedging to the perimeter of the plot and native tree species through out. In addition, appropriate native species and wildlife friendly planting were included within our ornamental planting palette.